Scholar-run digital health courses mix isolation and coaching in school

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By Jordyn Sava
Employed author

Before Covid-19 hit, Carly Baker, sophomore nursing major, was looking forward to taking classes at the college gym almost every day. She always enjoyed exercising with friends, cycling for miles and running on the treadmill. Of course, she felt terrible when Covid-19 stopped everything.

Since Baker was well known in the gym, college asked her to teach her own virtual class in the fall and she absolutely loves it.

“I always wanted to teach, but I wasn’t sure of my athletic abilities,” she said. “Now it’s something I can’t live without. I I hope to help others achieve their goals and discover their love for fitness. “

After Covid-19 forced gyms to close, the college’s recreation and wellness center put together a series of virtual group fitness classes to cheer up students.

Not only did virtual fitness classes keep things normal in the early stages of the pandemic, but they were also helpful in making students feel connected to college, cultivating healthy habits, and enabling students to follow a routine from the safety of theirs To start or maintain from home.

“The courses the college offered gave me something to look forward to,” said Baker. “Even on the worst of days, they motivated me to lead a social life while I was just quarantined with my family.”

Although the college is now “flexible”, the Recreation and Wellness Center continues to offer these courses virtually to the many students living at home.

Some of the classes available include Barre, Kickboxing, Yoga, Cycling, Abs and Booty, High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), and Baker’s Body Sculpt.

Baker now teaches Body Sculpt weekly, every Thursday at 5 p.m. through college.

“People can expect to be challenged, but also to be offered many modifications to train at the intensity that is best for them,” she said. “I try to include a variety of movements from week to week so it doesn’t get boring.”

Participants of all fitness levels are welcome. Because all classes are virtual, Baker primarily chooses movements that use body weight to accommodate unequipped participants.

To make people feel more comfortable, Baker shows positivity and motivation in her entire class. She constantly informs about the timing and always prepares her participants for which steps should follow.

Having attended different classes, Baker knows what can be motivating and what can be annoying to hear from a teacher. She bases her personal commentary within the class on her own experience.

“I motivate my participants the way I like to be motivated. I try to find the balance between being energetic or optimistic and being overbearing, ”she said.

Not only did virtual fitness classes keep things normal in the early stages of the pandemic, but they were also helpful in making students feel connected to college, cultivating healthy habits, and enabling students to follow a routine from the safety of theirs To start or maintain from home (Envato elements).

To secure a place in their class, students can simply download Atleto, the official app for the leisure and wellness department. All events, activities and courses on offer are added weekly by the teachers and hosted through the app.

Some courses, like Baker’s, are offered live while others are recorded with links that can be saved for future reference.

Baker encourages students living on and off campus to come out and try a class.

“I would definitely recommend these courses! It’s a great way to meet new people and try new things, especially since all classes are currently free due to the virtual format, ”said Baker.

Not only did Baker find something she’s passionate about, but she’s proud to be part of the small-group fitness trainer community.

“I will continue to teach throughout my degree and hopefully expand the teaching into postgraduate life,” she said. “Although the lessons are virtual, I think I’ve learned a lot and I’m looking forward to learning more so I can keep improving.”